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The Wien Center for Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Disorders, Mount Sinai Medical Center and 1Florida ADRC present
  • 17th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment Symposium
  • Special Topic Workshop
  • Alzheimer's Public Educational Forum

January 19-20, 2019 | Miami Beach, Florida, USA

PAST PROGRAMS

2004-2018

16th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Genetics, Cognitive Reserve and Behavior in MCI and Alzheimer’s Disease

Saturday, JANUARY 20, 2018  ♦  8:00 am – 7:30 pm                                

7:15 am – 8:15Check-in and Continental Breakfast
8:15 – 8:30Welcome Notes/Introduction to SymposiumRanjan Duara, MD, FAAN (bio)
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:30-11:30SESSION 1: APOE4, Non E4 and Epigenetics of LOAD
Chair: Andrew Saykin, PsyD, ABCN
Indiana University
8:30 – 8:35Session OverviewAndrew Saykin, PsyD, ABCN (bio)
Indiana University
8:35 – 9:05KEYNOTE LECTURE: APOE4, Non E4 and Epigenetics of LOAD and Vascular Cognitive Impairment

Sudha Seshadri, MD (bio/abstract)
Boston University
9:05 – 9:10Q&A
9:10 – 9:25Role of Apolipoprotein E in Neurodegenerative Dementia Henrietta Nielsen, PhD (bio/abstract)
Stockholm University
9:25 – 9:30Q&A
9:30 – 9:45Polygenic Hazard Score in LOADChin Hong Tan, PhD (bio/abstract)
University of California San Francisco
9:45 – 9:50Q&A
9:50 – 10:05Epigenetics in Alzheimer’s DiseaseDebomoy Lahiri, PhD (bio/abstract)
Indiana University
10:05 – 10:10Q&A
10:10 – 10:40BREAK
10:40 – 10:55 Imaging Genetics of APOE and Non-APOE factors in LOAD Andrew Saykin, PsyD, ABCN (bio/abstract)
Indiana University
10:55 – 11:00Q&A
11:00-11:30Panel Discussion/Q&A
11:30am – 2:40 pm
SESSION 2: Cognitive and Brain Reserve
Chair: Ronald Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
11:30 am – 11:35Session OverviewRonald Petersen, MD, PhD (bio)
Mayo Clinic
11:35 – 12:05 KEYNOTE LECTURE: Brain and Cognitive Reserve: Epidemiology, Imaging and Biological MechanismsYaakov Stern, PhD (bio/abstract)
Columbia University
12:05 pm - 12:10 pmQ&A
12:10 – 12:25The Role of Cognitive Reserve in the Neuropsychological Diagnosis of Normal and Abnormal AgingDorene Rentz, PsyD (bio/abstract)
Harvard Medical School, BWH, MGH
12:25 –12:30Q&A
12:30 –1:30LUNCH
1:30 –1:45The Impact of Cognitive Reserve on CSF Biomarkers of AD Sanjay Asthana, MD (bio/abstract)
University of Wisconsin
1:45 – 1:50Q&A
1:50 – 2:05Behavioral Markers of Cognitive ReserveRobert Wilson, PhD (bio/abstract)
Rush University
2:05 – 2:10Q&A
2:10 – 2:40Panel Discussion/ Q&AGlenn Smith, PhD (bio)
University of Florida
2:40 – 5:20SESSION 3: Mild Behavioral Impairment
Chair: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
2:40 – 2:45OverviewMary Ganguli, MD, MPH (bio)
University of Pittsburgh
2:45 – 3:15KEYNOTE LECTURE: Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI): Symptoms, Prodrome, or False Alarm?Constantine Lyketsos, MD (bio/abstract)
Johns Hopkins Medicine
3:15 – 3:20Q&A
3:20 – 3:35Neuropsychiatric Symptoms as Predictors of MCI and Dementia: Epidemiologic EvidenceYonas Geda, MD (bio/abstract)
Mayo Clinic
3:35 – 3:40Q&A
3:40 – 4:10BREAK
4:10 – 4:25Are there Neuroimaging Signatures for MBI?
A Review of the Five Domains
Zahinoor Ismail, MD, FRCPC (bio/abstract)
University of Calgary
4:25 – 4:30Q&A
4:30 – 4:45Association of Amyloid-β with Depression-Related Symptoms in Cognitively Normal Older AdultsNancy Donovan, MD (bio/abstract)
Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
4:45 – 4:50Q&A
4:50 – 5:20Panel Discussion/ Q&A
5:20 – 7:30Networking Reception

The Annual Early Alzheimer’s Diagnostic and Treatment Workshop:

Bilingualism, Neuropsychology, Imaging and Treatment in MCI and AD

Sunday, JANUARY 21, 2018 ♦ 8:30 am – 1:30 pm                                    

7:30 am – 8:30Continental Breakfast and Check-in
8:30 – 8:35Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD, FAAN (bio)
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:35 – 9:05SPECIAL LECTURE: Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: Where We Are and Prospects for the Future Serge Gauthier, MD, FRCPC (bio/abstract)
McGill University
9:05 – 9:10Q&A
9:10 – 12:10WORKSHOP:
Bilingualism, Neuropsychology, Imaging and Treatment in MCI and AD
CHAIR: Monica Rosselli, PhD
Florida Atlantic University
9:10 – 9:15IntroductionMonica Rosselli, PhD (bio/abstract)
Florida Atlantic University
9:15 – 9:45KEYNOTE LECTURE: Bilingualism: Consequences for the Progression of MCI Howard Chertkow, MD (bio/abstract)
McGill University
9:45 – 9:50Q&A
9:50 – 10:05Active Bilingualism as a Cognitive Reserve Mechanism in Mild Cognitive ImpairmentMarco Calabria, PhD (bio/abstract)
Pompeu Fabra University
10:05 – 10:10Q&A
10:10 – 10:40BREAK
10:40 – 10:55Structural MRI and Memory in Bilinguals and Monolinguals with MCI Monica Rosselli, PhD (bio/abstract)
Florida Atlantic University
10:55 – 11:00Q&A
11:00 – 11:15Bilingualism and Dementia Prevention: Neuroprotection as Studied in The BrainJubin Abutalebi, MD, PhD (bio/abstract)
Vita-Salute San Raffaele University
11:15 – 11:20Q&A
11:20 – 11:35Neural Efficiency in Lifelong Bilinguals Studied by Functional MRIBrian Gold, PhD (bio)
University of Kentucky
11:35 – 11:40Q&A
11:40 – 12:10Panel Discussion/Q&AModerator: David Loewenstein, PhD (bio)
University of Miami
12:10 – 1:10LUNCH

The Annual Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum:

Genetics, Cognitive Reserve, Behavior, Bilingualism and Treatment in MCI and Alzheimer’s Disease

Sunday, JANUARY 21, 2018 ♦ 1:30 pm – 5:40 pm                                 

1:00 - 1:30pmCheck-in and Refreshments
1:30 – 1:35Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD, FAAN (bio)
Mount Sinai Medical Center
1:35 – 5:00 EDUCATIONAL FORUM:
Genetics, Cognitive Reserve, Behavior, Bilingualism and Treatment in MCI and AD
CHAIR: David Loewenstein, PhD
University of Miami
1:35 – 1:40OverviewDavid Loewenstein, PhD (bio)
University of Miami
1:40 – 2:10KEYNOTE LECTURE:
Advances in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease
Serge Gauthier, MD, FRCPC (bio/abstract)
McGill University
2:10 – 2:15Q&A
2:15 – 2:30Genetics of Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Andrew Saykin, PsyD, ABCN (bio/abstract)
Indiana University
2:30 – 2:35Q&A
2:35 – 2:50The Role of Cognitive Reserve in Normal and Abnormal AgingDorene Rentz, PsyD (bio/abstract)
Harvard Medical School, BWH, MGH
2:50 – 2:55Q&A
2:55 – 3:25BREAK
3:25 – 3:40Mood, Personality, and Behavior Changes in Early Alzheimer's DiseaseMary Ganguli, MD, MPH (bio/abstract)
University of Pittsburgh
3:40 – 3:45Q&A
3:45 – 4:00The Importance of Bilingualism for Cognitive Aging and Development of DementiaHoward Chertkow, MD (bio/abstract)
McGill University
4:00 – 4:05Q&A
4:05 – 4:50Panel Discussion and Q&A
4:50 – 5:00Closing NotesRanjan Duara, MD, FAAN (bio)
Mount Sinai Medical Center

SUPPORTERS


This event is graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.


The event is presented by:

Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

http://www.msmc.com/neurosciences/wien-center-for-alzheimers-disease-memory-disorders


The event is made possible by educational grants from

Lilly USA, LLC.

www.lillygrantoffice.com

and with support from

Biogen

www.biogen.com


MEDIA PARTNERS

12th Human Amyloid Imaging Conference

12th Drug Discovery for Neurodegeneration Conference

Alzheimer’s Association SE Florida Chapter

American Board of Professional Neuropsychology

American Neuropsychiatric Association

Care Weekly

Dutch Society for Neuropsychology

Geriatrics Journal

German Society for Neuropsychology

Hispanic Neuropsychological Society

International Neuropsychology Society

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

Karger Publishers

The Int’l Conference on Frontotemporal Dementia

15th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Biological and Clinical Aspects of Disorders Presenting as MCI

Saturday, JANUARY 14, 2017  ♦  8:00 am – 7:30 pm                                

7:15 am – 8:15Check-in and Continental Breakfast
8:15 – 8:30Welcome Notes/Introduction to SymposiumRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:30-11:25SESSION 1: Seeding and Spread in Neurodegenerative Diseases
Chair: Todd Golde, MD, PhD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL


Alzheimer’s disease is the most frequent pathology associated with cognitive impairment in older adults. Rare disorders such as Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) are known to be seeded and propagated by infectious agents known as prions. Evidence is emerging that common neurodegenerative disorders such as AD may also involve seeding (by misfolded proteins) and subsequent spreading among vulnerable neuronal paths. The precise mechanisms are unclear.

This session will first explore the findings at the cellular level for seeding and propagation, including possible therapeutic targets. Clinical evidence from imaging studies for spreading of neurodegeneration in a stereotypical pattern and the clinical implications of this phenomenon will also be presented.
8:30 – 8:35Session OverviewTodd Golde, MD, PhD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
8:35 – 9:05KEYNOTE LECTURE: Mechanisms of Protein Seeding in Neurodegenerative Diseases
Lary Walker, PhD
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
9:05 – 9:10Q&A
9:10 – 9:25Prion-like Propagation of Alpha-synuclein Aggregates in the Brain of Wild-type MiceNolwen Rey, PhD,
Van Andel Institute, Grand Rapids, MI
9:25 – 9:30Q&A
9:30 – 9:45Prion-like Mechanisms of Disease Progression on Alzheimer’s Disease: New Therapeutic Opportunities David Borchelt, PhD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
9:45 – 9:50Q&A
9:50 – 10:15BREAK
10:15 – 10:30Network-Based Spread in AD: Evidence from Multi-Modal Human NeuroimagingGil Rabinovici, MD
University of California San Francisco, CA
10:30 – 10:35Q&A
10:35 – 10:50 Clinicopathologic Heterogeneity of Neurofibrillary Tangle PatternsMelissa Murray, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL
10:50 – 10:55Q&A
10:55-11:25Panel Discussion/Q&A
11:25 am – 3:15 pm
SESSION 2: Progression Rates in Preclinical and Prodromal Neurodegenerative Disorders
Chair: Ronald Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN


Among patients with preclinical or prodromal AD and other neurodegenerative disease the mode of progression of the disease may be variable, resulting in variable pathological and clinical subtypes of the disease. Baseline measures using fluid biomarkers, imaging and sensitive neurocognitive assessments, can increase the accuracy of predicting future cognitive decline at an early stage of disease. This session will explore these variable pathological subtypes and will describe the utility of clinical symptoms, genetics, functional and structural MRI, amyloid PET and Tau PET in predicting clinical progression of early AD.
11:25 am – 11:30Session OverviewRonald Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
11:30 – 12:00 KEYNOTE LECTURE: Community Predictors of Progression in Preclinical and MCI Due to ADRonald Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
12:00 pm - 12:05 pmQ&A
12:05 – 12:20Cognitive Decline in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

Beth Mormino, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
12:20 –12:25Q&A
12:25 –12:40 Imaging Predictors of Progression (Amyloid and Tau PET) Adam Fleisher, MD
Eli Lilly & Co., Inc., Indianapolis, IN
12:40 – 12:45Q&A
12:45-1:45LUNCH
1:45 – 2:00CSF Predictors of Disease ProgressionAnne Fagan, PhD
Washington University in St Louis, MO
2:00 – 2:05Q&A
2:05 – 2:20Modeling Progression in Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Network ConnectivityAshish Raj, PhD
Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY
2:20 – 2:25Q&A
2:25 – 2:45Longitudinal Progression of Biomarkers and Clinical Symptoms in Dominantly Inherited ADEric McDade, DO, and Jason Hassenstab, PhD
Washington University in St Louis, MO
2:45 – 2:50Q&A
2:50 – 3:20Panel Discussion/ Q&A
3:20 – 3:45BREAK
3:45 – 6:15SESSION 3: Sleep Disorders and MCI
Chair: Steven DeKosky, MD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL


Subjects with MCI and dementia are more likely to have sleep disorders than subjects with normal cognition. Specific patterns of sleep disorders are characteristic of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Lewy Body Dementia and Parkinson Dementia. Sleep is important for consolidating memory and other cognitive function. During sleep there is a change in the cellular architecture of the brain, opening channels which allow toxic substances, including beta-amyloid to be removed from the brain.

Evidence for a causal relationship between poor sleep and future cognitive decline is provided by epidemiological, clinical and brain imaging studies. Some studies also suggest that sleep can be protective against AD.
3:45 – 3:50Session OverviewSteven DeKosky, MD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
3:50 – 4:05Sleep, Aging, and Brain Health: Implications for PreventionAdam Spira, PhD
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
4:05 – 4:10Q&A
4:10 – 4:25Poor Sleep before Dementia: A Risk Factor for Cognitive Decline and Clinical Conversion?Bryce Mander, PhD
University of California, Berkeley, CA
4:25 – 4:30Q&A
4:30 – 5:00KEYNOTE LECTURE: The Glymphatic System, Sleep and NeurodegenerationJeffrey Iliff, PhD
OHSU, Portland, OR
5:00 – 5:05Q&A
5:05 – 5:20Obstructive Sleep Apnea, MCI and AD: Is there a Direct Link?Ricardo Osorio, MD
New York University Center on Brain Health, NY, NY
5:20 – 5:25Q&A
5:25 – 5:40REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative DiseaseMichael Howell, MD
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
5:40 – 5:45Q&A
5:45 – 6:15Panel Discussion/ Q&A
6:15 – 8:00Networking Reception

The Annual Early Alzheimer’s Diagnostic and Treatment Workshop:

Assessment of Neuropsychological Test Performance in Cross Cultural Studies

Sunday, JANUARY 15, 2017 ♦ 8:30 am – 1:30 pm                                    

7:30 am – 8:30Continental Breakfast and Check-in
8:30 – 12:30WORKSHOP:
Assessment of Neuropsychological Test Performance in Cross Cultural Studies
CHAIR: Monica Rosselli, PhD
Florida Atlantic University


This workshop will present genetic, clinical and neuroimaging findings conducted in Colombia on the largest known cohort of carriers of a rare autosomal dominant mutation with early age of onset. Furthermore, the prevalence of MCI and AD in Latin America will be analyzed. Additional presentations will explore the clinical validity of of neuropsychological tests for Spanish and English speakers living in the US who are diagnosed with MCI and early AD. Cultural and demographic variables in the diagnosis of abnormal aging will be discussed. The use of neuroimaging to better understand the relationship of structural brain changes to performance on neuropsychological tests among Spanish and English speakers will also be presented.
8:30 – 8:35Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD,
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:35 – 8:40IntroductionMonica Rosselli, PhD
Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL
8:40 – 9:05KEYNOTE LECTURE: The E280A PS1 Paisa Mutation and BiomarkersFrancisco Lopera, MD
Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
9:05 – 9:10Q&A
9:10 – 9:25Brain imaging and Biomarker Abnormalities in Cognitively-unimpaired Individuals with Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's DiseaseYakeel Quiroz, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
9:25 – 9:30Q&A
9:30 – 9:45The Development of Novel Cognitive Stress Paradigms for Detection of Early Cognitive Impairment in Cross-Cultural ResearchDavid Loewenstein, PhD
University of Miami, Miami, FL
9:45 – 9:50Q&A
9:50 – 10:05Neuropsychological Test Performance in Spanish and English Speakers with Normal Cognition and MCI Rosie Curiel, PsyD
University of Miami, Miami, FL
10:05 – 10:10Q&A
10:10 – 10:40BREAK
10:40 – 10:55Culture, Bilingualism, Neuropsychological Tests, and Biomarkers in MCI and early ADMonica Rosselli, PhD
Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL
10:55 – 11:00Q&A
11:00 – 11:15Education and Late-life Cognitive Health in Diverse PopulationsDan Mungas, PhD
University of California, Davis, CA
11:15 – 11:20Q&A
11:20 – 11:35MCI in Latin American CountriesRicardo Nitrini , MD, PhD
FMUSP, São Paulo SP, Brazil
11:35 – 11:40Q&A
11:40 am – 12:00 pmConcluding RemarksVladimir Hachinski, MD, DSc
University of Western Ontario, London, ON
12:00 – 12:30 Panel Discussion/Q&A
Moderator: Oscar Lopez, MD
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
12:30 – 1:30LUNCH

The Annual Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum:

New Concepts in Alzheimer’s Cause, Progression and Therapy

Sunday, JANUARY 15, 2017 ♦ 1:30 pm – 5:40 pm                                 

1:00 - 1:30pmCheck-in and Refreshments
1:30 – 5:00 EDUCATIONAL FORUM:
New Concepts in Alzheimer’s Cause, Progression and Therapy
Chair: David Loewenstein, PhD
University of Miami, Miami, FL


This event is intended for the public at large, including individuals at-risk for AD, their family members, as well as professionals from various fields who may be interested in an up-to-date review of some aspects of AD research. The forum will allow the audience to interact with top scientists in the field in the presence of a moderator. This educational segment aims to provide information about the latest research in the field of AD, including an on-going prevention trial, several epidemiological studies of aging, and investigations showing the effect of sleep on memory and mental health.
1:30 – 1:40Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
1:40 – 2:10KEYNOTE LECTURE:
Research to Clinic: Alzheimer's Disease Participation in Clinical Trials
Maria Carrillo, PhD
Alzheimer’s Association, Chicago, IL
2:10 – 2:15IntroductionDavid Loewenstein, PhD
University of Miami, Miami, FL
2:15 – 2:30Basis of Therapeutic Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease Reisa Sperling, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
2:30 – 2:35Q&A
2:35 – 2:50Declining Incidence of Alzheimer’s Disease – Is it Real? Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
2:50 – 2:55Q&A
2:55 – 3:10How Do Neurodegenerative Diseases Progress?Lary Walker, PhD
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
3:10 – 3:15Q&A
3:15 – 3:45BREAK
3:45 – 4:00The Glymphatic System and the BrainJeffrey Iliff, PhD
OHSU, Portland, OR
4:00 – 4:05Q&A
4:05 – 4:20Why Sleep Should Not Be Ignored in Alzheimer's DiseaseBryce Mander, PhD
University of California, Berkeley, CA
4:20 – 4:25Q&A
4:25 – 4:55Panel Discussion and Q&A
4:55 – 5:00Closing NotesRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL

SUPPORTERS


This event is graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.


The event is presented by:

Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

http://www.msmc.com/neurosciences/wien-center-for-alzheimers-disease-memory-disorders


The event is made possible by educational grants from

Lilly USA, LLC.

www.lillygrantoffice.com

and with support from

Biogen

www.biogen.com


MEDIA PARTNERS

11th Human Amyloid Imaging Conference

ADDF’s 11th Annual Drug Discovery for Neurodegeneration Conference

Alzheimer’s Association SE Florida Chapter

Alliance for Aging, Inc.

American Neuropsychiatric Association

Geriatrics Journal

Hispanic Neuropsychological Society

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

Karger Publishers

Latino Alzheimer’s & Memory Disorders Alliance

Latino Center on Aging

14th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Risk Factors for Cognitive Decline: Cardiovascular Disease, Inflammation and Subjective Symptoms

Saturday, JANUARY 16, 2016  ♦  8:00 am – 7:30 pm                                

7:00-8:00amContinental Breakfast and Check-in
8:00-8:15Introduction to the SymposiumRanjan Duara, MD,
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:15-9:00KEYNOTE LECTURE: Genes, AD Pathology, Cerebrovascular Disease, and AD Dementia
David A. Bennett, MD
Rush University Medical Center
9:00-12:30MINISYMPOSIUM 1: Vascular Disease, Neuroinflammation and Cognition
Chair: Charles S. DeCarli, MD, University of California, Davis
9:00-9:20Aging, Alzheimer Disease and Vascular Pathology: Which are the Determinants of Cognitive Impairment?Charles Duyckaerts, MD, PhD
Hôpital Pitié Salpêtrière
9:20-9:40Innate Immune Activation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Differential Effects on Amyloid and Tau PathologyDavid Morgan, PhD
University of South Florida
9:40-10:00Genetic Pathways Linking Neuroinflammation, Vascular Disease and NeurodegenerationSudha Seshadri, MD
Boston University
10:00-10:30BREAK
10:30-10:50Impact of Vascular Risk Factors on Cognition Independent of Amyloid and MRI Measures of AD and CVD Charles S. DeCarli, MD
University of California, Davis
10:50-11:10Systemic Inflammation Triggers Acute Delirium, Brain Injury and Contributes to Accelerated NeurodegenerationColm Cunningham, PhD
Trinity College Dublin
11:10-11:30Markers of Inflammation and Immune Activation, Small Vessel Disease, Amyloid Deposition and Progression to Dementia in Non-Demented IndividualsOscar Lopez, MD
University of Pittsburgh
11:30-11:50Lifestyle Intervention To Prevent Cognitive ImpairmentMiia Kivipelto, MD, PhD
Karolinska Institutet
11:50am-12:50pmMiniSymposium 1 Discussion
Moderator: Vladimir Hachinski, CM, MD, DSc, FRCP, University of Western Ontario
12:50-1:50LUNCH
1:50-5:20MINISYMPOSIUM 2: Subjective Cognitive Impairment: Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Progression
Chair: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH, University of Pittsburgh
1:50-2:10The Epidemiological Relevance of Subjective Cognitive DeclineIngmar Skoog, PhD
University of Gothenburg
2:10-2:30Subjective Cognitive Concerns and Biomarker Evidence of Preclinical Alzheimer’s DiseaseRebecca Amariglio, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital/Brigham and Women's Hospital
2:30-2:50Subjective Cognitive Impairment, Neuroticism and Brain Amyloid LoadBeth Snitz, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
2:50-3:10Family History, Subjective Memory Complaints and Brain Amyloid Load in the ADNI StudyAndrew J. Saykin, PsyD
Indiana University School of Medicine
3:10–3:40BREAK
3:40–4:00Neuropathology Among Cognitively Normal Brain Donors, With & Without Subjective Memory ComplaintsFrederick Schmitt, PhD
University of Kentucky
4:00-4:20APOE e4, Subjective Memory Symptoms and Cognitive DeclineMarwan Sabbagh, MD
Barrow Neurological Institute
4:20-5:20MiniSymposium 2 Discussion
Moderator: Ronald C. Petersen, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic
5:20-7:30NETWORKING RECEPTION

The Annual Early Alzheimer’s Diagnostic and Treatment Workshop:

Diagnosis of Preclinical and Prodromal Alzheimer’s Disease

Sunday, JANUARY 17, 2016 ♦ 8:30 am – 1:30 pm                                    

7:00-8:00 amContinental Breakfast and Check-in
8:00-8:15Introduction to the WorkshopRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:15-9:00KEYNOTE LECTURE:
KEYNOTE LECTURE: The Prevalence of Amyloid Positivity by Age, APOE Genotype and Cognitive Status - Implications for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease
Philip Scheltens, MD, PhD
VU University Medical Center
9:00-12:30WORKSHOP:
Diagnosis of Preclinical and Prodromal Alzheimer's Disease
Chair: David Knopman, MD, Mayo Clinic Rochester
9:00-9:20Biomarker Patterns in Subtypes of Alzheimer’s Disease - Implications for Pathophysiology and DiagnosisGil Rabinovici, MD
University of California, San Francisco
9:20-9:40Detection of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease: Implications for Prevention TrialsReisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
9:40-10:00The Added Value of the International Working Group - 2 Diagnostic Criteria for Alzheimer’s DiseaseBruno Dubois, MD
Hôpital Pitié Salpêtrière
10:00-10:30BREAK
10:30-10:50Diagnostic Complexities in Current Clinical and Morphological Criteria for Alzheimer's DiseaseJulie Schneider, MD
Rush University Medical Center
10:50-11:10A Canadian Consensus: Defining MCI for Clinical and Research PurposesHoward Chertkow, MD
McGill University and Jewish General Hospital
11:10-11:30Harmonized Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for the Incipient Symptomatic Stages of Alzheimer’s DiseaseJohn C. Morris, MD
Washington University School of Medicine
11:30am-12:30pmWorkshop Discussion
Moderator: David Knopman, MD, Mayo Clinic Rochester
12:30pm-1:30pmLUNCH

The Annual Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum:

Memory Complaints and the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

Sunday, JANUARY 17, 2016 ♦ 1:30 pm – 5:40 pm                                 

1:00-1:30pmCheck-in and Refreshments
1:30-1:35Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
1:35-5:30EDUCATIONAL FORUM:
Memory Complaints and the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
Chair: Steven T. DeKosky, MD, University of Florida
1:35-1:45Introduction to the Educational ForumChair: Steven T. DeKosky, MD
University of Florida
1:45-2:10Alzheimer Disease: Between the Inevitable and the ModifiableVladimir Hachinski, CM, MD, DSc, FRCP
University of Western Ontario
2:10-2:35What are Subjective Memory Complaints and What is their Significance?Ingmar Skoog, PhD
Gothenburg University
2:35-3:00Why is an Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Important and How Do We Achieve It?Frederick Schmitt, PhD
University of Kentucky
3:00–3:30 BREAK
3:30 – 3:55The Link Between Depression, Anxiety and Alzheimer’s Disease Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
3:55-4:20What have we Learned from Brain Autopsies of Persons with and without DementiaDavid A. Bennett, MD
Rush University Medical Center
4:20–4:45The Importance of Participating in Clinical Trials in Alzheimer’s DiseaseAmanda Smith, MD
University of South Florida
4:45-5:30Panel Discussion and Q&A
Moderator: Steven T. DeKosky, MD, University of Florida

SUPPORTERS


This event is graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.


The event is presented by:

Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

http://www.msmc.com/neurosciences/wien-center-for-alzheimers-disease-memory-disorders


The event is made possible by educational grants from

Lilly USA, LLC.

www.lillygrantoffice.com

and from

Piramal Healthcare

www.piramal.com/imaging


MEDIA PARTNERS

Karger Publishers (www.karger.com)

Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer’s Disease (LEAD – www.leadcoalition.org)

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (www.j-alz.com)

The Academy of the American Board of Professional Neuropsychology (AABN – aabnonline.com)

ADDF’s 10th Annual Drug Discovery for Neurodegeneration Conference (www.worldeventsforum.com/addf/drugdiscovery)

10th Human Amyloid Imaging conference (www.worldeventsforum.com/hai)

The International Neuropsychological Society (www.the-ins.org)

Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (www.tandfonline.com/toc/ncen20/current)

Association of Neuropsychology Students in Training (www.div40-anst.com)

Hispanic Neuropsychological Society (HNPS – hnps.org)

13th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Alzheimer and Non-Alzheimer’s Causes of MCI and Dementia  

Saturday, JANUARY 17, 2015  ♦  8:00 am – 7:30 pm                                

7:00-8:00Continental Breakfast and Check-in
8:00am-8:15Introduction to the SymposiumRanjan Duara, MD,
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:15-9:00KEYNOTE LECTURE: Assessing the Current Roadmap for Developing Novel Disease Modifying Therapies for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Todd E. Golde, MD, PhD
University of Florida
9:00-12:30MINISYMPOSIUM 1: Non-Alzheimer’s Dementias
Chair: Todd E. Golde, MD, PhD
University of Florida
9:00-9:25Neurodegenerative Tauopathies – Clinicopathologic CorrelationsDennis W. Dickson, MD
Mayo Clinic
9:25-9:50Role of TDP-43 in Non-Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Neurodegenerative DiseasesKeith A. Josephs, MD, MST, MSc
Mayo Clinic
9:50-10:15BREAK
10:15-10:40Emerging Concepts in Chronic Traumatic EncephalopathyAnn C. McKee, MD
Boston University
10:40-11:05New Approaches towards Interventions in Frontotemporal DementiaZachary A. Miller, MD
University of California, San Francisco
11:05-11:30How to Diagnose Early (Prodromal) Lewy Body DementiaIan McKeith, MD, FRC Psych, FSB, FMedSci
Newcastle University
11:30am-12:30pmDiscussion
Moderator: Rosa Rademakers, PhD
Mayo Clinic
12:30-1:30LUNCH
1:30-5:20MINISYMPOSIUM 2: Clinical & Imaging Features of Prodromal Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration
Chair: Bradford C. Dickerson, MD
Harvard University
1:30-1:55Brain Networks in Neurodegenerative DiseaseMichael D. Greicius, MD, MPH
Stanford University
1:55-2:20MCI of the FTLD type: Clinical Features and Imaging and Molecular BiomarkersBradford C. Dickerson, MD
Harvard University
2:20-2:45Imaging Characteristics of Prodromal Familial FTLDJonathan Rohrer, MD, PhD
University College London
2:45-3:10Clinical and Imaging Characteristics of Early bvFTDKatya Rascovsky, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
3:10-3:30BREAK
3:30–3:55Clinical and Imaging Features of Prodromal PPAEmily J. Rogalski, PhD
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
3:55-4:20What is the Etiology of Amyloid Negative Mild Cognitive Impairment?David A. Wolk, MD
University of Pennsylvania
4:20-5:20Discussion
Moderator: Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, MD
University of Washington, Seattle
5:20-7:30NETWORKING RECEPTION

The Annual Early Alzheimer’s Diagnostic and Treatment Workshop:

Longitudinal and Cross Sectional Studies (Amyloid and Tau-Pet, Structural MRI, FDG-PET and Clinical Status  

Sunday, JANUARY 18, 2015 ♦ 8:30 am – 1:30 pm                                    

7:00-8:00 amContinental Breakfast and Check-in
8:00-8:10Introduction to the WorkshopRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
8:10-8:55KEYNOTE LECTURE:
Longitudinal Changes in Autosomal Dominant AD: Implications for Treatment
John C. Morris, MD
Washington University
8:55-12:30WORKSHOP:
Longitudinal and Cross Sectional Studies (Amyloid and Tau-Pet, Structural MRI, FDG-PET and Clinical Status)
Chair: John C. Morris, MD
Washington University
8:55-9:20Correlating Cognition and Biomarkers in Preclinical APOE e4 and PS1 Mutation Carriers Richard J. Caselli, MD
Mayo Clinic Scottsdale
9:20-9:45Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Imaging studies in Non-demented Subjects: Mayo Clinic Study of AgingPrashanthi Vemuri, PhD
Mayo Clinic
9:45-10:10Understanding Biomarker Relationships in Alzheimer's Disease: The ADNI ExperienceSusan M. Landau, PhD
University of California, Berkeley
10:10-10:40BREAK
10:40-11:05Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Studies in LOAD: AIBL ExperienceChristopher C. Rowe, MD, FRACP
Austin Health
11:05-11:30T807 Tau PET in Aging and DementiaKeith A. Johnson, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital
11:30 am-12:30 pmDiscussion
Moderator: Reisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc
Harvard Medical School/MGH
12:30-1:30LUNCH

The Annual Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum:

Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors for MCI and AD  

Sunday, JANUARY 18, 2015 ♦ 1:30 pm – 5:40 pm                                 

1:00-1:30 pmCheck-in and Refreshments
1:30 - 1:40Welcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
1:40-5:30EDUCATIONAL FORUM:
Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors for MCI and AD
Chair: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
1:40-2:00Introduction to the Educational Forum
Chair: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
2:00-2:25Factors which Modify Longevity in MCI and Dementia – the Mayo Clinic ExperienceRonald C. Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
2:25-2:50Personality, Lifestyle and Cognitive Health in Old AgeRobert S. Wilson, PhD
Rush University Medical Center
2:50-3:15 Cognitive Engagement and Risk for MCI and DementiaRobert Woods, PhD
Bangor University
3:15-3:45Break
3:45-4:10Risk Factors for Dementia in the Oldest OldClaudia H. Kawas, MD
University of California, Irvine
4:10-4:35How Does Exercise Benefit People at Risk for Dementia?Neva Kirk-Sanchez, PhD, PT
University of Miami
4:35-5:00Vascular Factors which Modify Risk for DementiaSandra Black, MD, FRCP
Sunnybrook Research Institute
5:00-5:40Panel Discussion and Q&A Moderator: Steven T. DeKosky, MD
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

SUPPORTERS


This event is graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.


The event is presented by:

Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

http://www.msmc.com/neurosciences/wien-center-for-alzheimers-disease-memory-disorders


The event is made possible by educational grants from

Lilly USA, LLC.

www.lillygrantoffice.com

and from

GE Healthcare

www3.gehealthcare.com


MEDIA PARTNERS

Karger Publishers (www.karger.com)

Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer’s Disease (LEAD – www.leadcoalition.org)

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (www.j-alz.com)

American Neuropsychiatric Association (ANPA – www.anpaonline.org)

Seniority Matters (www.senioritymatters.com)

PharmaVoice (www.pharmavoice.com)

30th International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease International (www.alzint.org)

9th International Conference on FTD (www.ftdvancouver2014.com)

ADDF’s 9th Annual Drug Discovery for Neurodegeneration Conference (www.worldeventsforum.com/addf/drugdiscovery)

9th Human Amyloid Imaging conference (www.worldeventsforum.com/hai).

12th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Predicting and Measuring Progression in Early Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)  

Saturday, JANUARY 18, 2014 ♦ 8:00 am – 7:30 pm

8:00 – 8:10 amIntroduction to the MCI Symposium 2014Ranjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:15 – 8:55Keynote Address
The Relationship between Aβ Deposition, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Function in Normal and Impaired Individuals
Clifford R. Jack, MD
Mayo Clinic
8:55 – 11:40 amMiniSymposium 1

A-beta Deposition, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Function in Normal and Abnormal Aging Chair:
Chester Mathis, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Current models of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) suggest amyloid deposition is the first in a chain of events which ultimately lead to neurodegeneration and progressive cognitive and functional deterioration. It appearsthat most of the cognitive effects of Aβ deposition are associated with neurodegeneration, although Aβ itself may cause subtle cognitive impairment, independent of neurodegeneration.Evidence of Aβ deposition (amyloid positive status) in the brain is present on PET scans or CSF studies among 90 to 95% of individuals with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease, almost all of whom will also have evidence of neurodegeneration, as evidenced by hippocampal atrophy and/or cortical atrophy in AD signature neocortical regions.

Among subjects with amnestic MCI only about 50 to 60% are found to be amyloid positive, whereas the frequency of neurodegeneration on MRI scans among aMCI subjects appears to be 80 to 85%. Based on the hypothesis that Aβ deposition initiates the neurodegenerative process in AD, it would be expected that amyloid biomarkers should be positive (Amy+ status) more frequently than biomarkers of neurodegeneration (i.e., MRI+ status), especially in the predementia phases of Alzheimer’s disease. Results from several groups suggest that MRI+ status occurs more frequently than Amy+ status among subjects with MCI.

While the presence of non-AD conditions, such as hippocampal sclerosis and frontotemporal dementias may be responsible, in part, for the higher frequency of MRI+ status, it seems unlikely that the prevalence of non-AD neurodegenerative conditions would be so high among elderly individuals in the MCI stage of impairment. Alternative explanations for this apparently aberrant sequence of biomarker changes should be considered. The relationship between Aβ deposition in the brain and the onset of neurodegeneration may be influenced by a variety of factors, intrinsic and extrinsic to the brain. These include the Aβ load (much higher in dominantly inherited AD than sporadic AD), the age of the individual, the influence of various AD risk genes, individual lifestyles (diet, levels of physical and cognitive activity and socialization), the presence of depression and anxiety and systemic illnesses, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and chronic inflammatory conditions.

These factors may have a bearing on the sequence of biomarker and cognitive changes which appear as an individual progresses from preclinical to clinical AD. In this MiniSymposium we will explore relationships between amyloid deposition, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment.
8:55 – 9:201. Amyloid, Glucose Metabolism, and Longitudinal ChangeSusan Landau, PhD
University of California, Berkeley
9:20 – 9:452. Beta Amyloid Deposition in Very Healthy Adults: Risk Factors and Cognitive ConsequencesDenise C. Park, PhD
University of Texas, Dallas, TX
9:45 – 10:103. The Role of Imaging Biomarkers in the Prediction of MCI and Dementia Due to ADRonald Petersen, MD
Mayo Clinic
10:30 – 10:554. Variation in the Sequence of AD Biomarkers According to Brain Regions and Genetic FactorsGaël Chételat, PhD
Inserm-EPHE-Université de Caen, Basse-Normandie
10:55 – 11:205. Cognitive Correlates of Neurodegeneration Related to Beta-amyloid and Aging in Clinically Normal IndividualsElizabeth Mormino, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital
11:20 – 11:456. Clinical Implications of Concordant and Discordant Beta-Amyloid and Neurodegenerative Abnormalities in Mild Cognitive ImpairmenDavid A. Wolk, MD
University of Pennsylvania
11:45 am – 12:45 pmDiscussionDiscussant: William Klunk, MD, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
1:45 – 4:30MiniSymposium 2

Approaches to Measuring Cognitive and Functional Change across the MCI Spectrum
Chair: David Loewenstein, PhD, ABPP
University of Miami
The diagnosis of cognitive states relies on two pillars of clinical assessment, namely, the history from the subject (and/or one or more informants), providing information about the presence, severity and course of functional impairment, and an objective cognitive (neuropsychological) assessment.

Heterogeneity in progression rates in MCI and dementia may reflect intrinsic variability, error in the measurement of cognitive and functional status,due to a number of factors, including:
(1) cognitive reserve
(2) language and cultural factors
(3) socioeconomic status
(4) motivation
(5) informant bias
(6) co-morbid medical, neurological and psychiatric conditions.

The inclusion of biomarkers, which are not affected by the above mentioned factors, in the diagnostic process has improved the identification of individuals with very early stages of AD. Biomarkers are also sensitive for detecting pre-dementia conditions but there are no validated biomarkers for measuring progression rates in AD. It is important, therefore, to seek out clinical measures which are sensitive for measuring progression in very early stages of disease.

Although clinical outcomes, such as functional change, are subject to measurement error, at this time they remain the most important methods for measuring progression in pre-dementia states.

The optimal methods for assessing cognitive and functional progression, including the use of composite scores for measuring global change in pre-dementia conditions and for demonstrating treatment effects in clinical trials is an active area of research. In this MiniSymposium, current research exploring the utility of various clinical measures, and their correlation with rates of progression indicated by biomarkers, will be addressed.
1:45 – 2:051. Development of Novel Paradigms for Assessing and Monitoring Cognitive Change Across the MCI and PreMCI SpectrumDavid Loewenstein, PhD, ABPP
University of Miami
2:05 – 2:302. Biomarker Values Predictive of Cognitive Decline in MCI: Baseline or Progression?Hiroko H. Dodge, PhD
Oregon Health & Science University
2:30 – 2:553. Computer-Based Assessment of ADLs and IADLs in MCISara Czaja, PhD
University of Miami
2:55 – 3:204. On Cognitive Performance as the Endpoint in Clinical TrialsBen Schmand, PhD
University of Amsterdam
3:40 – 4:055. Cognitive Trajectories Associated with β-amyloid Deposition in Normal Aging and MCI Beth Snitz, PhD
University of Pittsburgh
4:05 – 4:306. Probability of Transition To and From MCI: Models of Clinical and Cognitive FeaturesFrederick Schmitt, PhD
University of Kentucky
4:30 – 5:30Discussion Discussant: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
5:30 – 7:30NETWORKING RECEPTION

3rd Annual Early Alzheimer’s Diagnostic and Treatment Workshop:

Diagnostic Case Studies of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), MCI-AD and Probable AD  

Sunday, JANUARY 19, 2014 ♦ 8:30 am – 1:30 pm

8:30 – 8:35Introduction to the WorkshopRanjan Duara, MD Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:35 – 9:15KEYNOTE LECTURE
Challenges in the Diagnosis of Early Alzheimer’s Disease
Stephen Salloway, MD The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
9:15 – 11:30DIAGNOSTIC CASE STUDIES OF PRECLINICAL AD, MCI-AD AND PROBABLE AD

Cases with concordant and discordant biomarkers and clinical results will be discussed. Several cases with follow-up to autopsy will be included.
Chair: Howard Chertkow, MD, McGill University and Jewish General Hospital
9:15 – 9:35Case 1: Clinical Implications of Discordant BiomarkersDavid A. Wolk, MD
University of Pennsylvania
9:35 – 9:55Case 2: A Case of Vascular MCICharles DeCarli, MD
University of California, Davis
9:55 – 10:15Case 3: Conflicting Biomarkers in Clinical PracticePhilip Scheltens, MD, PhD
VU University Amsterdam
10:15 – 10:30BREAK
10:30 – 10:50Case 4: Longitudinal Cognitive and Imaging Changes in a 70 y/o woman with Initial Subjective Cognitive ConcernsDorene Rentz, PsyD
Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women's Hospital
10:50 – 11:10Case 5: When Amyloid Imaging Isn’t EnoughTammie Benzinger, MD, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine
11:10 – 11:30Case 6: Biomarker Use to Assist in Diagnosis of Atypical MCI Presentations/ Imaging for Identifying non-ADAdam S. Fleisher, MD
Banner Alzheimer's Institute
11:30 am – 12:30 pmOpen Discussion
12:30 – 1:30LUNCH

2nd Annual Early Alzheimer’s Public Education Forum

The Role of Amyloid Imaging in the Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment 

Sunday, JANUARY 19, 2014 ♦ 1:30 pm – 5:30 pm


 

The Early Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum is intended for the public at large, including individuals at-risk for Alzheimer’s disease, their family members, as well as professionals from various fields who may be interested in an up-to-date review of some aspects of Alzheimer’s research. This educational segment aims to provide information about the latest research in the field of diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, including the use of amyloid imaging for this purpose. The forum will allow the audience to interact with top scientists in the field in the presence of a moderator.

1:30 – 1:40 pmWelcome NotesRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
1:40 – 2:00Introduction to the Educational Forum Stephen Salloway, MD
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
2:00 – 4:25The Role of Amyloid Imaging in the Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive ImpairmentChair: Stephen Salloway, MD, MS
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
2:00 – 2:25Incorporating Biomarkers of Amyloid and Neurogeneration in Clinical Evaluation of Mild Cognitive ImpairmentDavid A. Wolk, MD
University of Pennsylvania
2:25 – 2:50The Role of Cognitive Reserve in the Clinical Presentation of Alzheimer’s DiseaseDorene Rentz, PsyD
Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women’s Hospital
2:50 – 3:10 BREAKMichael D. Devous, PhD
Avid Radiopharmaceuticals
3:10 – 3:35Amyloid Imaging in Healthy Aging: Impact on Brain Function and CognitionStephen Salloway, MD
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
3:35 – 4:00Challenges in the Diagnosis of Early Alzheimer’s DiseaseAdam S. Fleischer, MD, MAS
Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
4:00 – 4:25The Role of Amyloid Imaging in the Diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment: Current Research and Clinical UtilityPanel Discussion and Q&A
Panelists:
Michael Devous, PhD, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals
Keith Fargo, PhD, Alzheimer’s Association
Adam S. Fleisher, MD, MAS, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Dorene Rentz, PsyD, Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Stephen Salloway, MD, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
David A. Wolk, MD, University of Pennsylvania
5:25 – 5:30Closing Notes Ranjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center


SUPPORTERS

This event was graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.

The event was presented by:



Exhibitors

Alzheimer’s Association Southeast Florida Chapter

11th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium:

Predicting and Measuring Progression in Early Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)

Saturday, JANUARY 19, 2013 ♦ 7:00 am – 7:30 pm

7:00 – 8:00 amCheck-in and Breakfast
8:00 – 8:15Welcome and IntroductionRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:15 – 10:45Minisymposium 1
Predictors of Progression to MCI and AD (Epidemiology)
Chair: Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
1. New Approaches to Understanding the Relationships of Risk Factors to
Cognitive Decline
David A. Bennett, MD
Rush Medical School, Chicago, IL
2. The Flynn Effect; How Secular Changes Influence the Predictive Value of Cognitive Performance and the Role of Computer Tomography in Prodromal Dementia in the H70 Study in Gothenburg, SwedenSimona Sacuiu, MD, PhD
Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
3. Rates and Predictors of Progression from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia: The Mayo Clinic Study of AgingRosebud Roberts, MB, ChB
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
4. Risk Factors for Age of Onset of AD in the Cache County Study Peter Rabins, MD, MPH
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
5. The Fluidity of MCI in the Community and the Role of Vascular Biomarkers in Predicting Progression in the Indianapolis-Ibadan StudyHugh Hendrie, MB, ChB, DSc
Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
6. Risk Factors for MCI Development and for MCI Progression: Are They The Same?Mary Ganguli, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
10:45 – 11:00Break
11:00 am – 12:00 pmOpen Discussion Discussant: Ronald Petersen, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
12:00 – 1:00LUNCH
1:00 – 2:00 Keynote Lecture: Solving the Dilemma of Treatment Versus Prevention Strategies for Alzheimer’s Disease Todd Golde, MD, PhD
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
2:00 – 4:15Mini – Symposium 2
Utility of Biomarkers for Predicting and Measuring Progression in Normal Aging, MCI and AD
Chair: Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
1. The Cortical Signatures of Alzheimer’s Disease and Frontotemporal Degeneration: Quantitative MRI Biomarkers Detectable prior to DementiaBrad Dickerson, MD, MMSc
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
2. Biomarkers, Cognitive Reserve and Cognition in Alzheimer’s Disease Prashanthi Vemuri, PhD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
3. Neuroimaging for Predicting and Measuring Progression in Preclinical Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s DiseaseTammie Benzinger, MD, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
4. MRI, FDG-PET and EEG for Predicting Progression in Aging, MCI and AD Philip Scheltens, MD, PhD
VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
5. Highlights of Biomarker and Clinical Outcomes from Recent AD Treatment TrialsStephen Salloway, MD, MS
Brown Medical School, Providence, RI
4:15 – 4:30Break
4:30 – 5:30Open Discussion Discussant: Victor Villemagne, MD,
Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
5:30 – 7:30NETWORKING RECEPTION

Early Alzheimer’s Disease Workshop:

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention Trials

Sunday, JANUARY 20, 2013 ♦ 8:00 am – 1:30 pm

7:00 – 8:00 amCheck-in and Breakfast
8:00 am – 8:10Introduction to the WorkshopRanjan Duara, MD Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL
8:10 – 9:00 amKeynote Lecture: Launching the Era of Alzheimer’s Prevention ResearchEric M. Reiman, MD Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Phoenix, AZ
9:00 – 11:15amChallenges in Treating Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease Chair: Reisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MChair: Reisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
1. A New Era: DIAN and the Secondary Prevention of Symptomatic Alzheimer’s DiseaseJohn C. Morris, MD Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
2. Anti-Amyloid Treatment of Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease: The A4 StudyReisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
3. The Role of Fluid Biomarkers in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Treatment TrialsAnne M. Fagan, PhD Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
4. The Role of Amyloid Imaging in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Treatment TrialsAdam S. Fleisher, MD, MAS Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Phoenix, AZ
5. Addressing the Ethical Challenges of Preclinical AD Prevention TrialsJason Karlawish, MD University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
6. Consent for Revealing Biomarker Status in AD Prevention TrialsScott Roberts, PhD University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI
11:15am – 11:30Break
11:30am – 12:30 pmOpen Discussion Discussant: Philip Scheltens, MD, PhD VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
12:30 – 1:30 pmLUNCH

Alzheimer’s Public Educational Forum:

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention Trials

Sunday, JANUARY 20, 2013 ♦ 2:00 pm – 5:30 pm

2:00 – 2:10 pmIntroduction to the Educational ForumRanjan Duara, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center,
Miami Beach, FL
2:10 – 4:30 pmAlzheimer’s Disease Prevention TrialsChair: Eric M. Reiman, MD, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Phoenix, AZ
Measuring Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease Using Brain Imaging TestsSusan Landau, PhD
University of California,
Berkeley, CA
Q&A
Treating Alzheimer’s Before Symptoms BeginReisa A. Sperling, MD, MMSc,
Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,
Boston, MA
Q&A
What We Know About the Genetics of Alzheimer’s DiseaseAllan Levey, MD, PhD
Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA
Q&A
The Importance of Being Informed and Participating in Trials
Q&A
4:30 – 5:30 pmQuestions from the Audience and Panel Discussion
Panelists: Maria Carrillo, John C. Morris, Steve Salloway, Eric Reiman,
Reisa A. Sperling, Scott Roberts


SUPPORTERS

This event was graciously underwritten by Marilyn and the late Myers Girsh.

The event was presented by



Supported by an educational grant from Lilly USA, LLC. For further information concerning Lilly grant funding visit www.lillygrantoffice.com

10th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

January 14-15, 2012

 

9th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

April 29-30, 2011

8th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

March 12-13, 2010

7th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

March 27-28, 2009

6th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

March 7-8, 2008

5th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

April 13-14, 2007

4th Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

February 24-25, 2006

3rd Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

March 11-12, 2005

2nd Annual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Symposium

February 27-28, 2004